Q2-2017 Performance Report

Portfolio Performance

My very unaudited portfolio performance in the second quarter of 2017, the three months ended June 30, 2017 is approximately +0.6%. The year-to-date performance for the 6 months ended June 30, 2017 is +19.3%.

My 11 year, 6 month compounded annual growth rate performance is +18.2% per year.

Portfolio Percentages

At June 30, 2017 (change from Q1-2017):

20% common equities (-4%)
28% preferred share equities (+8%)
31% corporate debt (-7%)
4% net equity options (+1%)
18% cash and cash equivalents (+3%)

Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding.

USD exposure: 52% (+2%)

Portfolio is valued in CAD (CAD/USD 0.7714);
Other values derived per account statements.

Portfolio commentary

All things considered, the nearly flat performance was a good indicator of a relatively boring quarter – there was very little theatrics to discuss. Major portfolio decisions include liquidating my KCG Holdings equity stake, and retaining the equity options until the last possible nanosecond before expiration. I will promptly liquidate the position if the market is acceptably close to the USD$20.00 cash buyout number (or I will just wait for the transaction to proceed). This will result in an effective liquidation of another 4% of the portfolio. I also have another 4% position in their senior secured bonds which will be called out after the transaction completes, which should be around July 21st (after the quarter-end). The net result of these transactions are that the portfolio is effectively 25% cash and I have no idea where to deploy it beyond VGSH (USD) and VSB.TO (CAD) – at least with those I get paid around 125 basis points to wait.

Sadly my entries into the VGSH/VSB.TO short-term fixed income vehicles has been incredibly lacklustre – with continued threats of rising interest rates, even these short duration vehicles are taking a minor hit of capital value – an inexpensive lesson that yield is rarely risk-free.

I took a single digit percent position in a company trading well under tangible book value and earning positive income and cash flows during the quarter. I estimate when the market wakes up to this position (there has been little if any analyst coverage, nor has there been any public exposure to it at all) it will trade up to double its present value. I won’t write about this one until it appreciates or my original investment thesis is incorrect. There is a credible reason why there is still price pressure even at the depressed levels. The company has spent most of its public life trading around 25% higher than what it is trading at right now.

This was my first new common share position in over a year. I’ve been close to pulling the trigger on some other ones but they didn’t quite reach the correct price point.

I also took a non-trivial stake in DRM.PR.A preferred shares. I’ve been in and out of this over the past couple years, but this time I suspect it will be a staple position for quite some time. It only requires 33% margin so it is not too much of an anchor to keep, especially since the spread between the margin rate and the dividend rate is huge. This is effectively a “cash parking” vehicle until they get called away by the parent company (I was expecting this to happen quite some time ago). When it happens I will have the problem of more capital going from a near-guaranteed 7% tax-preferred income to 1%. It is my hope that management continues to ignore this issue (other than paying quarterly dividends). I wouldn’t buy it at the current premium.

That’s about it for the quarter.

In terms of price movements, there were three items which caused negative portfolio movements. Genworth MI took collateral damage with regards to the collapse of Home Capital Group, but has swiftly recovered from reaching a low of about $30.50/share. At that level, Genworth MI was in the low end of my price range, but it wasn’t low enough that I would re-purchase shares. Conversely, it is too cheap to sell at present prices. So I will be waiting and continuing to collect 44 cent quarterly dividends until the market decides that the equity is worth more.

Teekay Corporation unsecured debt also significantly declined to reflect the calamity that is hitting their offshore division, but I do not believe the underlying value of this debt is compromised by virtue of the value of their natural gas division. This was the primary detractor from my portfolio performance this quarter. At a YTM of 13%, investors have a decent risk/reward situation at current prices.

The third detractor to performance was the Canadian dollar – as it appreciates, although I appreciate the purchasing power, it does detract negatively on my US dollar components. Since my portfolio is nearly 50/50 CAD/USD, each percent the Canadian dollar rises means a half percent drop in my portfolio value.

Finally, Gran Colombia Gold announced they will be redeeming 5.7% of their 2020 senior secured debt outstanding at par. I will be pocketing the cash and looking forward to future payments – this series of debt is first in line, secured by a gold mine and an investor can be patient to collect on the debt. Although I do not have a place to deploy the cash, I look forward to receiving the payment and reducing my concentration in this particular debt issuer (I purchased most of the senior secured debt at around 55-60 cents on the dollar). The two relevant risks here are the political stability in Colombia (which is not bad at present) and the price of gold continuing to meander at its present level – or go higher. 75% of the free cash flows from the company have to go towards redeeming the senior secured debt due in 2020, so over time I will expect to get paid back.

The portfolio underperformed the S&P 500 slightly, while outperforming the TSX. I do not invest for relative returns, but psychologically it always feels better to know that somebody is losing more money than I am. The portfolio in the last quarter has also underperformed my 11.5 year CAGR (Compounded Annual Growth Rate), but this is to be expected given my very risk-adverse positioning at present. I will warn readers that my +18.2% CAGR is likely to decline in the upcoming quarters as making a percent or two each quarter is below the +18.2%/year benchmark.

Outlook

Crude oil markets are trending significantly lower than what most participants thought would be happening. This is having a significant impact on most Canadian oil and gas companies, whom have been continuing to address leverage matters. While prices imply there is pressure, it is not yet at a crisis point that it was back in February 2016, but if the prevailing trend continues, it definitely appears that there will be some more fractures in the Canadian oil and gas space due to excessive leverage levels. There may be opportunities in the debt market at this point (witness the calamity hitting Teekay right now).

In the USA broad market, the S&P 500 is dominated by the top 10 companies (Amazon, Facebook, Google, Netflix, etc.) and when extracting out those liquidity high-flyers, we have a market that is treading water and some targets of opportunity are starting to emerge that have value-like characteristics. However, the US federal reserve is slowly tightening the screws in terms of loose monetary policy and this most certainly will have a continued dampening effect on equity valuation as the cost of capital continues to rise. They are doing this slowly as to not trigger a market crash, but most participants should be alerted that the 30-year treasury bond, currently at a yield of about 2.8%, is not rising despite the rising-rate environment. This is something to be very cautious about.

The Bank of Canada also spooked the markets in the second week of June when they were making public noise about increasing the interest rates. Although I do not predict they will take much action, if any, until the corresponding long bond rates rise, this may have the effect of putting a bottom on the slow and steady decline of the Canadian dollar. Clearly the commodity markets are not helping Canadian currency, and if there is some sort of return in commodities, then the Canadian dollar would actually be better positioned for a rise.

In general, I continue to remain bearish. Although this stance has not been in correspondence with the major indicies (which have risen considerably), my portfolio continues to generate a positive return while remaining extremely risk-adverse at present time. I am of the general belief that index investing continues to dislocate pricing in the market from true value and this trend is not likely to abate until such a point that it is identified that pouring capital in a non-price discriminatory vehicle is not a prudent way to invest money – instead, it is diversifying through obscurity and not achieving true risk reduction.

I am finding it very difficult to invest cash in this environment. It is painful to wait, but waiting I will do.

The average maturity term on my debt portfolio is just a shade over 30 months. This will continue to lower as my issuers go down to maturity. I am not interested in long-duration bonds at all at the moment.

I project over the rest of this year, if things go to a reasonable level of fruition, that I will see another 2-3% of appreciation, while taking little risk. This is also assuming that I do not see further candidates for investing the non-trivial amount of cash in the portfolio. Nothing imminent is on the horizon. My research pipeline has been bone-dry.

To put a polite summary to my investment prospects, I feel stuck. Little in the pipeline and little of inspiration. Waiting is not popular, but it will allow me to preserve capital for the time where it will be more appreciated.

(Update, July 17, 2017: After doing my internal audit, the quarterly performance was revised from +0.7% to +0.6% for the quarter. The year-to-date was revised from +18.7% to +19.3% due to a rather embarrassing formula error on the tracking spreadsheet. The changes are reflected in the numbers above. The 11.5 year CAGR remains unchanged.)

Portfolio - Q2-2017 - Historical Performance

Performance and TSX Composite is measured in CAD$; S&P 500 is measured in US$. Total returns indices are with dividends reinvested at time of receipt.
YearDivestor PortfolioS&P 500 (Price Return)S&P 500
(Total Return)
TSX Comp. (Price Return)TSX Comp.
(Total Return)
11.5 Years (CAGR):+18.2%+5.9%+8.2%+2.6%+5.6%
2006+3.0%+13.6%+15.6%+14.5%+17.3%
2007+11.7%+3.5%+5.5%+7.2%+9.8%
2008-9.2%-38.5%-36.6%-35.0%-33.0%
2009+104.2%+23.5%+25.9%+30.7%+35.1%
2010+28.0%+12.8%+14.8%+14.5%+17.6%
2011-13.4%+0.0%+2.1%-11.1%-8.7%
2012+2.0%+13.4%+15.9%+4.0%+7.2%
2013+52.9%+29.6%+32.2%+9.6%+13.0%
2014-7.7%+11.4%+13.5%+7.4%+10.6%
2015+9.8%-0.7%+1.3%-11.1%-8.3%
2016+53.6%+9.5%+12.0%+17.5%+20.4%
Q1-2017+18.6%+5.5%+6.1%+1.7%+2.2%
Q2-2017+0.6%+2.6%+3.1%-2.4%-1.6%

Places to park US dollars

If you have US cash collecting dust in your brokerage accounts, you are probably wondering if you can scrape a percent or two from them in relatively safe instruments instead of surrendering that money to your brokerage firm. After doing some exhaustive research on the matter, I believe there are three relatively low-risk ETFs to park them into, all of them offered by Vanguard and ranked from most risky to least:

  • Vanguard Short-Term Corporate Bond Fund (Nasdaq: VCSH) – MER of 0.15%, duration of 2.8, yield to maturity 2.2%, invested in relatively safe corporate securities;
  • Vanguard Short-Term Bond Fund (NYSE: BSV) – MER of 0.12%, duration of 2.6, yield to maturity 1.2%, invested in mostly government/treasury securities;
  • Vanguard Short-Term Government Bond Fund (Nasdaq: VGSH) – MER of 0.15%, duration of 1.8, yield to maturity 0.6%, invested completely in government/treasury securities.

There is still interest rate risk embedded in these securities and you never know if there will be a 2008-style meltdown in the financial markets that would only render BSV and VGSH as cash-like instruments.

Want more yield? You have to invest in junk bonds, a much more dangerous ballgame – and potentially more expensive for investors!

As readers know, I have been in a bunkering down mentality with respect to the markets. I am very defensively positioned and do not expect much returns in my portfolio in 2011.